Dingo Fact Sheet

Common Name:

Dingo

Scientific Name:

Canis lupus dingo

Wild Status:

Vulnerable

Habitat:

Very versatile, occupies many habitats

Country:

Australia

Shelter:

Caves, Rabbit Holes, Hollow Logs

Life Span:

10 years

Size:

up to 35lbs

Cool Facts:

  • It is believed that dingoes originated from Indonesia and brought to Australia with seafarers about 3,500 years ago.
  • The dingo is the largest extant predator on land. They prey on a variety of animals, including mammals, birds, reptiles, and even insects.
  • Most adult and pups travel in packs. Young male dingoes are commonly seen alone.
  • In some parts of Australia, it is legal to have dingoes as pets, however, in many places it is illegal to keep them as pets.
  • Dingoes are dogs but they cannot bark, instead, they howl.

Details:

The dingo is a medium-sized dog. They are agile, fast, and slender. Captive dingoes are heavier, but wild dingoes are commonly seen with exposed ribs.  Their coat varies in color depending on location, often with tan, tan and black, and beige white coats. They do not express distinct patterns but many individuals are observed with a white tipped tail, white/lighter feet and chest. Their heads are large, wide, and have elongated muzzles, much like jackals. They have elongated pointed canines than domestic dogs. Dingoes carry their tail low. rather flat, they do not curve over the their backs and are not long enough to reach the ground.

Taxonomic Breakdown:

Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Carnivora Family: Canidae Genus: Canis Species: C. lupus Subspecies: C. l. dingo

Conservation & Helping:

The dingo population is known to hybridized with domestic dogs. Because of the significant proportion of dingoes considered hybrids, pure dingoes are being considered as a vulnerable species. While pure dingo populations are decreasing, no major difference in the overall dingo population has been noted. In fact, they are often considered pests in many parts of Australia. Populations living in protected areas remain protected but in many unprotected areas, management has to be incorporated to help protect livestock.

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